Friday, March 9, 2018

Meet the world’s first rechargeable proton battery. No more lithium.


Researchers say it’s a crucial step towards cheaper and more environmentally-friendly energy storage.



The RMIT-developed proton battery connected to a voltmeter. Photograph: RMIT

Researchers at RMIT university in Melbourne have created the world`s first rechargeable proton battery.

Despite the battery is just a small-scale prototype, it has the potential to be competitive with currently available lithium-ion batteries.

The rechargeable battery uses carbon and water instead of lithium.

The lead researcher Professor John Andrews said  “Lithium-ion batteries are great but they rely on ultimately scarce and expensive resources,” he said. “Hydro is also a good technology but suitable sites are limited and the cost may be very high.

“The advantage is we’re going to be storing protons in a carbon-based material, which is abundant, and we are getting protons from water which is readily available.”

The battery itself produces no carbon emissions and it can store electricity from zero-emissions renewables.

Andrews said it could be commercially available within five to 10 years.

“When it is commercially available, it would be a competitor to the Tesla Powerwall and then eventually we’d hope we might find applications at the scale of the huge Tesla battery [in South Australia] and even larger.”




No comments:

Post a Comment

Japan: Two small robotic rovers landed on the asteroid Ryugu.

Imaging Ryugu from an altitude of 6km Two small robotic rovers that had been released from Japan's space probe Hayabusa2 successfu...

Popular Posts